Marketing, Personal

What I Learned From Using Twitter Ads

twitterad

I’ve recently begun searching for a job again.

On top of the usual job boards and applying directly at the companies’ sites, I took a more proactive way by putting ads on myself. Because in the tech startup industry, positions can be carved for the right person – it isn’t a must for me to wait for the right opportunity to show up.

Here’s a sample of the tweets, and they all go to a page with my resume.

Twitter Ad Screenshot

Twitter ads are a cheap way of getting traffic, I spent between $0.07 – $0.35 per link click. It’s definitely something a marketer should consider when it comes to paid traffic. In terms of results, I did get a few emails on potential career opportunities and some buzz from Twitter users.

If you do try Twitter ads for yourself, here are some lessons I’ve learned on using Twitter ads.

Optimize Your Landing Pages For Mobile

Twitter is available on web and mobile. However, a large percentage of my ads were clicked on by users on mobile, which caught me by surprised.

My landing page was initially not optimized for mobile and that probably costs me some leads. If you are going to put ads on Twitter, you definitely want to make sure your landing page looks good on mobile.

Add A CTA In Your Ad Copy

I’ve read it from somewhere that adding a CTA in your tweet improves its spreadability. This is also true for ads. Adding a CTA isn’t complicated – all you need to do is to put a “Please RT” or something similar. When I change my ad copy from this:

“I’m looking for a job! Let me help you get better deal flow, partners and reach a wider audience across Asia.”

to this:

“Hire me to help you get better deal flow, partners and reach a wider set of audience all across Asia. Click for more

My CTR increased by 10%. Although this increase isn’t fantastic, it was a good result considering that all it needs was a tiny tweak in my ad copy.

Create Different Ads For Different Countries

Some countries are more social than others, so their engagement rates are much higher than others. I’ve placed my ads for APAC countries and I observed that Indonesia gave me the highest retweet rates. That’s not too surprising, considering that Indonesia and Philippines are big on social media.

Interestingly, Indonesia didn’t give me much followers – I had more new followers from Malaysia. If I were to put Twitter ads again, I will craft ads with different CTAs to suit the user behavior of different countries.

Forget About Custom Audience

Facebook only requires a minimum of 20 people to create a custom audience, Twitter needs 500 – 660. This makes precise targeting extremely difficult if your audience pool isn’t big.

I had an idea of buying a list of male and female Twitter handles so I can create custom audiences and target the people I’m going after by specifying that my ads are only shown to a specific gender.

That means that if I have a list of 50 handles that I want to target and they are mostly males, I would create a custom audience with this 50 handles by including 450 handles of female users (which I don’t care about). I’ll just select to show the ads to males for this campaign.

I’ve tried buying a list of bots/fake Twitter accounts off Fiverr, unfortunately that didn’t work. :(

Will I Use Twitter Ads Again?

All in all, I think ads on Twitter are great for paid traffic, it’s affordable and you can seed the virality of your content with the right copy (after all, it only takes 2 clicks to retweet).

But I would think twice about using Twitter ads for getting leads or sales because of how complex it is to reach the right audience. Or maybe it’s just that I have not figured how to do it properly.

If you know of any tips on putting up Twitter ads, do leave a comment below!

 

Elisha Tan is the Founder of TechLadies. TechLadies is a community for women in Asia to connect, learn, and advance as programmers in the tech industry. Elisha is also the Developer Programs Regional Lead for Asia Pacific at Facebook.

 
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Personal, Starting up

The Ghost

ghost

Many people know that entrepreneurship is hard and that founders all pay the psychological price of entrepreneurship. Rand Fishkin, Co-founder of MOZ, calls his mental cycle of train wreck The Loop. I have a Ghost.

I wrote this back in December 2013:

The Ghost

Instead of a loop, I have a ghost.

The ghost creeps up on me when I’m not watching – then it consumes me.

Instead of keeping my eye on the prize, focusing on that tiny glimmer of light I call hope, the ghost makes me focus on the 99.99% of darkness that surrounding it. Loudly echoing “you aren’t good enough”, “you aren’t good enough”, “YOU. AREN’T. GOOD. ENOUGH”.

I do not like the ghost, but I know it’s not leaving.

I guess most founders, including myself, have high internal locus of control. We believe that change is possible, and we are the ones to make it happen. So when things don’t go well, it’s incredibly hard for me to not take it personally, or take it as an reflection of my self-worth.

But for now, I’ll lay the Ghost to rest.

 

Elisha Tan is the Founder of TechLadies. TechLadies is a community for women in Asia to connect, learn, and advance as programmers in the tech industry. Elisha is also the Developer Programs Regional Lead for Asia Pacific at Facebook.

 
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Personal, Thoughts

What kind of tragedy deserves more sympathy?

Should there be a scale for tragedies, that we pay more attention to those events higher on the scale, ignoring those at the bottom?

I used to believe that people should help people first, not animals or the planet. So to me, NGOs dealing with animal welfare, environment or anything that does not directly improve the welfare of the human life are a waste of time.

Then I realized something.

Some care about people, some care about animals and some care about environment. We are different.

But we all fit.

The world is filled with different people and it’s like we’re different pieces of jigsaw puzzle. We can’t be more different but we cannot do without each other because the big picture can only happen when this different pieces come together. It is stupid to think one piece of puzzle is more important than the other.

So yea, neither is Boston or Pakistan is more tragic than the other, more deserving of attention or sympathy. In fact, don’t measure them on the same scale.

 

Elisha Tan is the Founder of TechLadies. TechLadies is a community for women in Asia to connect, learn, and advance as programmers in the tech industry. Elisha is also the Developer Programs Regional Lead for Asia Pacific at Facebook.

 
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Personal, Thoughts

Nice things or nice person

Just came across this status someone posted on FB,

Think I should stop being nice to people as most of the time people take it for granted. Being taken for granted is not a nice feeling to be honest. In any kind of relationships, there should be a good balance. Be it friendship, love relationship, kinship, teacher & student relationship, employer & employee relationship. As the saying goes, it takes two hands to clap. The person giving will eventually be tired if the receiving end is always taking. One day, the person giving will disappear eventually and say goodbye. People always regret whenever they lose something or someone but it will be too late by then. So, take a moment, remember and appreciate the people around you. Do not take things or anyone for granted.”

It got me thinking.

Do you do nice things to people to get rewarded (in this case, the feeling of being recognized or not taken for granted) or do you do nice things simply because you are a nice person?

A nice person does nice things regardless of responses.

I actually don’t remember when was the last time I did something nice without wanting to be rewarded with good feelings, a smile or a “thank you”. Do you?

 

 

Elisha Tan is the Founder of TechLadies. TechLadies is a community for women in Asia to connect, learn, and advance as programmers in the tech industry. Elisha is also the Developer Programs Regional Lead for Asia Pacific at Facebook.

 
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Personal

Pokemon

Once in a while I talk to myself, telling me that I want to be the best that I can be. And always, without fail, the pokemon theme song starts playing in my head.

 

 
The song is so &*#$%^#$ inspirational.

 

Elisha Tan is the Founder of TechLadies. TechLadies is a community for women in Asia to connect, learn, and advance as programmers in the tech industry. Elisha is also the Developer Programs Regional Lead for Asia Pacific at Facebook.

 
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